Five Time-tested Traditional Restaurants in Asakusa Tokyo

Five Time-tested Traditional Restaurants in Asakusa Tokyo

It seems like almost everyone is waiting with bated breath for the next big food trend to sweep the world. 

And we totally get it, bizarre food combinations or funky flavours are a trendy topic, injecting new life into the food world that can get stale for an everyday person eating the same few selections day in day out. 

In Japan, the country holds steadfast to its traditions and culinary heritage, and it’s typical to see small 15 to 20 seater shops that have been open for business for generations, unflinching in the face of rainbow grilled cheese or the latest food fad. 

In today’s foodscape, funky flavours or Instagrammable food has become a thing, and if you’re not caught up with the times, it’s easy to fade out of the minds of people. 

Traditional Japanese restaurants however, care not for the latest “in” food but focus on working tirelessly at perfecting their craft. If you’re looking for restaurants that have stood the test of time, serving decades old recipes, we recommend you pay these five venerable establishments a visit.

1. Asakusa Imahan

Asakusa Imahan has been serving traditional Japanese hotpot (Sukiyaki and Shabu-Shabu) for 124 years now, opening back in 1895. An institution in the Asakusa area, this historic culinary establishment is a stone’s throw away from the famed Senso-ji Temple. 

The preparation and consumption of both hotpot dishes are generally straightforward and simple — for Sukiyaki, beef (usually, though there are pork options) and vegetables are simmered in a sweet-salty sauce before being dipped in raw egg and for Shabu-Shabu, beef (again, there are pork alternatives) and vegetables are cooked in a broth before dipping in various sauces and taken with rice or noodles. 

What makes Asakusa Imahan stand out and continue to stand the test of time? The beef. The chefs at Asakusa Imahan insist on sourcing for the finest wagyu beef for its restaurants. 

Whether you opt for Sukiyaki or Shabu-Shabu, the lush marbling of wagyu beef at Asakusa Imahan will ensure that each slice of beef has a good ratio of fat to meat, giving you that perfect mouthful. 

Address:

3-1-12 Nishi-Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo, Japan

Opening Hours:

Daily 11:30 AM – 9:30 PM

2. Daikokuya Tempura

Tempura and Tendon are both supremely famous in Asakusa and there are honestly no shortage of restaurants you can choose from. 

Daikokuya Tempura is not the oldest tempura establishment in Asakusa, that honour probably goes to Nakasei. Daikokuya Tempura is not the most popular one either, that would be Masara. 

Upon entering Daikokuya, you’ll see it on practically every table, the tendon is what you’re here to order. Frying the Tempura exclusively in sesame oil, what makes Daikokuya Tempura special is that they dredge their tempura in dipping sauce before serving which results in it having a darker hue than usual. 

Operating since 1887, Daikokuya Tempura has been serving the Asakusa crowd for over a hundred years now. Also located near Senso-ji Temple, it’s a popular meal spot for anyone visiting the temple. 

Address:

1-38-10 Asakusa, Taito-ku, Tokyo, 111-0032

Opening Hours:

Sunday-Friday: 11 AM 8:30 PM, Saturday: 11 AM 9 PM

3. Asakusa Unatetsu

Charcoal-grilled to perfection and slathered with a sweet and sticky teriyaki sauce, a well-done unagi is certainly hard to beat. Asakusa Unatetsu is well known for their Hitsumabushi, which features finely chopped unagi before being placed on top of a bed of rice. 

What makes Hitsumabushi unique as well is the eating process/method. Differing from that of a typical Unadon, the unagi can be enjoyed in three different ways, each giving you a different experience. 

The first step would be to consume the unagi as it is, this will allow you to get a taste of the unagi without any added flavours. Next, add the various condiments (wasabi, chopped leek, etc.) and you’ll start to see how each condiment adds flavours and textures to the unagi. Lastly mix the unagi and rice with the dashi soup stock which would turn the dish into something of a rice porridge which is comforting and warms the body. 

There are many versions at Asakusa Unatetsu and we hear that the Shiraiyaki (eel cooked in fired pottery) comes highly recommended. The eel is seasoned with just salt and there’s no tare (sweet) sauce added during the preparation which means you’ll taste the natural flavour of the eel. Of course, the well-loved tare version is available as well!

Address:

1 Chome-2-11 Hanakawado, Taito City, Tokyo 111-0033, Japan

Opening Hours:

Daily 11:15 AM – 10 PM

4. Asakusa Mugitoro

Asakusa Mugitoro has been around 90 years, serving up traditional mugitoro since 1929. Mugitoro features boiled barley and rice topped with grated Japanese yam (tororo). 

Known for its sticky and slightly mushy texture, the tororo gives the overall dish a sweet taste. Mugitoro, however, is subtle and light, usually paired with side dishes that are generally stronger in flavour such as tuna pickled in soy sauce, or asari clams.

Asakusa Mugitoro offers a popular weekday lunch buffet that features their signature mugitoro which can be paired with a host of various ingredients from tamagoyaki (Japanese fried egg) to sashimi. 

Address:

2 Chome-2-4 Kaminarimon, Taito City, Tokyo 111-0034, Japan

Opening Hours:

Monday-Friday: 11 AM 4 PM, 5 PM – 10:30 PM

Saturday & Sunday: 11 AM 10:30 PM

5. Tsukushi

Tsukushi is the youngest establishment on this list, operating for just over 40 years. The restaurant’s specialty lies in Monjayaki, which is essentially Asakusa’s answer to Osaka’s famous okonomiyaki. 

Monjayaki would be the furthest thing away from being Instagrammable. Cooking on a teppanyaki plate in front of you, monjayaki just looks like a gooey mess and far from appetising. 

Take one bite with your mini spatula, however, and you’ll be floored with the flavour that is packed in that mouthful. One of the best sellers is “Gomoku” which means “five ingredients” and you’ll typically find seafood such as squid and Sakura shrimp amongst others. 

If you want to give their version of okonomiyaki a try as well, the “Deluxe” is a crowd favourite, featuring squid, shrimp, minced beef, and even pork ribs. 

Address:

2 Chome-4-13 Asakusa, Taito City, Tokyo 111-0032, Japan

Opening Hours:

Wednesday-Monday: 11 AM 11 PM

Tuesday: 11 AM 5 PM

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Lazarus Island Singapore – Your Digital Escape Just 20 minutes Away

Lazarus Island Singapore – Your Digital Escape Just 20 minutes Away

The digital age has made us more interconnected than ever before, but this interconnectivity has come at a cost. Everything is on our phones right now, and the subtle pressure to constantly upkeep our social media and work is draining our physical and mental batteries as well. 

That, in part, has resulted in many of us wanting an escape from our daily lives, contributing to this notion of chasing wanderlust to unplug and escape. I mean, look at all the beach getaways destinations that are marketing themselves as an untouched paradise that can whisk you away from pesky bosses and assignments. 

Typically, this escape takes the form of the Maldives or Boracay. But, it doesn’t have to be.

Just take a 15 to 20 minute boat ride to St John’s Island ($18 for a round trip), and cross a short link bridge, and you’ll find relief waiting for you in Lazarus Island. Now that’s a vacation that doesn’t require burning through your annual leave or any sort of meticulous planning.

Why go to all that trouble you ask? For the cheery seaside vibes, and the option to fly kites or have a picnic in peace, without the throngs of people that plague mainland choices like East Coast Park or Marina Barrage. Lazarus Island gives you a true off-the-beaten path experience that you wouldn’t expect to find so close to our shores. 

Here’s what you can expect to see and do on your day’s trip to Lazarus Island. 

A Small-scale Houtong Cat Village

If you are familiar with Taiwan, you’ll know of the Houtong Cat Village in Ruifang, New Taipei. With more than 200 cats living in the village, this lovely village is famously known for having more cats than residents.

Now, Lazarus Island does not have as many cats as Houtong, but it does have a sizeable cat colony. Once you cross the link bridge from St John’s Island, it won’t be long before a group of feline friends will start rushing up and clamouring for attention. 

You can bring food to feed the adorable cats (they seem to prefer wet food over dry ones), and if you’re lucky you’ll meet the one-eyed pirate cat that has netizens gushing over it. 

Cat lovers, be warned, you may never want to leave the island. 

Picture-perfect Beaches

Lazarus Island isn’t like your Maldives or Boracay — there’s no 5-star resort, spa, or world class service at your beck and call. The island has, in our opinion, the luxury (ironically) of not being commercialised at all.

We can’t say it’ll be that way forever, and there were plans to turn it into a beachside resort (which never materialised), but before/if it does, it’s an island that is truly untainted by any form of commercialisation. Other than a few pavilions and pathways, you’ll be hard pressed to find much indication of civilisation, save for seeing the Singapore skyline right across the sea.

Whether it is taking a short stroll along the beach or suntanning, it’ll be tranquil and serene experience, something that is certainly lacking in the beaches on mainland Singapore.

There are also no facilities like washrooms so be sure to use them at St John’s Island before making your way over.

Primed for Picnics and Kite Flying

The sparseness of people on Lazarus Island also makes it a great spot to have a picnic by the beach. Whether it’s a big family gathering or an intimate session with your partner, the largely secluded beaches of Lazarus Island would mean you don’t need to worry about anyone cramping your style.

Also, what’s a picnic without flying kites and the never-ending sea breeze at Lazarus will ensure an easy time getting your kite to fly up high. You also don’t have to worry about your kite getting tangled up with others or bumping into anyone whilst sending your kite into the air. 

Photo by britt gaiser on Unsplash.

#beachlife Photo Opportunities

Lazarus Island’s quiet and largely untouched state means the entire island presents many photo opportunities for the avid photographer for an outdoor shoot of a beach paradise.

From the sandy beaches to the lush forest, there’s plenty of backdrop for you to work your photography magic. During low tide, there’s a particularly bright blue and yellow boat resting on the shores of Lazarus which would add an interesting element to your photos.

Don’t be surprised when your friends think that you’re on a holiday on some island paradise far away from Singapore, when in truth, you’re barely half an hour away enjoying the secluded peacefulness of Lazarus Island.

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10 Best Things to See and Do in Vancouver

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I remember standing in the pouring rain, shivering while waiting in line at Ramen DANBO, a Japanese Ramen restaurant that served Fukuoka-style Tonkotsu ramen in the Kitsilano neighbourhood of Vancouver. 

Granted it seems weird to be having Japanese fare in a predominantly white country, but in actuality, it speaks to the multiculturalism that is slowly defining the racial demographic makeup of Vancouver. 

The waitresses were all Japanese who could speak English, Japanese-accented, but nonetheless, fluent in conversation. I was ushered to a singular seat at the counter and had a ramen experience not unlike the ones in Japan — all the way from the service down to a sip of the broth. 

I was brimming with excitement for my stopover in Vancouver and the ramen was a fabulous start. I had heard many nice things about the west coast of Canada, from the hipster cafes to the stunning mountainscape, and of course, the beautiful Stanley Park. 

My snapshot of Vancouver in a short 3 days lived up to my expectations and more; it is truly an all-encompassing city where you can take a dip in the ocean, hike a mountain, and hit the ski slopes all before dinner.

While there are a myriad of things you can do, here are the 10 things you should see and do when in Vancouver.

1. Stanley Park

Stanley Park draws an innumerable number of people on a daily basis, attracting close to 8 million people annually. The park is so huge (1,000 acres) that you can find beaches, stunning gardens, and even Canada’s largest aquarium can be found here. 

As Vancouver’s first park, it has a 130 year history of being the foremost greenspace in the city, reflecting Vancouverites’ passion and love for nature. With year-round activities and a constantly changing scenery (thanks to the temperate climate), there’s always something to see or do at Stanley Park. 

We’d recommend renting a bike from one of the many rental shops as we feel it’s the best way to explore the entirety of Stanley Park. 

2. Cafe Hopping

From brunches to sipping single origin coffee, it’s not surprising to find any cafe packed with people right from the opening. It may quite honestly be Vancouverites’ favourite pastime.

The coffee culture in Vancouver runs deep, starting with the European settlers that brought over their moka pots and espresso to ensure getting a high standard of coffee. Many of whom started roasters and coffee shops that are still operating today. This entrenched the Vancouver coffee culture which has expanded to specialty drinks and latte art. 

Today, Vancouver is home to many award winning baristas and cafes, often being hailed as one of the top 10 cities in the world for coffee. 

3. Granville Island

Granville Island is the hipster creative world of Vancouver. Originally an industrial island booming in the 1930s, it became a wasteland during the 1940s to 1960s before a revitalisation project began in 1975. 

Today, Granville Island is home to an eclectic mix of small businesses ranging from cafes to arts and crafts. The famous Public Market features a boatload of unique food and drinks that will make you salivate as you walk down aisle after aisle. 

There’s a fish and chips place overlooking the harbour that serves their fish and chips in dim sum steamer baskets, and boy are they delicious. 

4. Vancouver Island

If you have a chance to travel south to Vancouver Island, do it without any hesitation. 

Vancouver Island is where you get to see the influence of Vancouver’s British colonial past manifest in its Victorian architecture. The British Columbia Parliament Building is perhaps the most iconic facade of Victoria city, located on the southern end of Vancouver Island. 

Victoria also happens to be the capital city of the province of British Columbia. Famously known as “The Garden City”, Victoria on Vancouver Island is decked out with many beautiful gardens and summer would prove to be one of the best times to visit. 

5. Capilano Suspension Bridge

One of Vancouver’s most popular tourist attractions, this 140m suspension bridge sees droves of tourists every day. Capilano is actually the anglicised name of First Nations great Squamish chief Kia’palano who lived in the area during the early years of the 1800s. 

An extensive nature park, though not on the scale of Stanley Park, the Capilano Suspension Bridge is just one of the many things you can do at the park. With cliff and treetop walks, along with a raptors ridge where you can see live owls and eagles, it’s a nature adventure that is a short escape from the city. 

6. Grouse Grind

If you didn’t already know or haven’t already guessed, Vancouverites are in love with the outdoors, and a hike through Grouse Grind is a rite of passage to experiencing Vancouver. 

Grouse Grind is a 2.9km hiking trail up Grouse Mountain, a trail also dubbed as “Mother Nature’s Stairmaster”. Definitely not for the faint-hearted, the Grouse Grind is an intense and challenging hiking trail but well worth the satisfaction when you conquer it. 

7. Beautiful Gardens

Vancouver truly has no shortage of beautiful and stunning gardens but there are two that slightly edge over the top. 

Perhaps the last thing you’ll expect to see in Vancouver is the figure of Dr. Sun Yat Sen, much less a garden dedicated to his name. However along Carrall Street, right in the heart of Chinatown, is a serene and tranquil Chinese garden that feels like an oasis isolated from the bustling streets outside. 

Modelled after the gardens in the Ming Dynasty, the Dr. Sun Yat Sen Classical Chinese Garden is gorgeous. 

If flowers are more your thing, the VanDusen Botanical Garden will be right up your alley with a myriad of flower collections with a bloom calendar for the different seasons so you know what flowers are available for viewing!

8. Vancouver Mountains

The Vancouver mountainscape and the activities it inspires is an inextricable part of the Vancouver lifestyle. From spring to autumn, mountains such as the above mentioned Grouse Mountain is popular amongst hikers wanting to get stunning views from the peak or simply to get in touch with nature. 

In the Winter, mountains such as Mount Seymour and Cypress Mountain are popular skiing and snowboarding haunts. In this sense, the mountains attract people all year round, becoming a popular attraction for anyone during any part of the year. 

9. Whale Watching

Marine life in Vancouver is rich and diverse, and Orca and Humpback whales frequent the waters of Vancouver. With many guided tours, there’ll be a great chance for you to catch a glimpse of these majestic creatures. 

Trust me, it’s a mesmerising sight as you see huge whales propel themselves up from the waters coming for air before diving deep back into the ocean. Aside from whales, there’ll be numerous other marine life that you can spot like the porpoise and seals. 

10. Richmond Night Market

We are well-versed in our Asian night markets, from Chatuchak in Bangkok to Shilin night market in Taiwan, we are no strangers when it comes to night markets. 

In Vancouver, there is the annual Richmond Night Market which only happens during the summer months of the year. Boasting food from different regions of Vancouver, the selection of food and drinks at Richmond Night Market is eclectic and diverse. 

Expect food trends like rainbow grilled cheese, classics like fried karaage chicken, and for this year, there’s a “SHELLabration” of shellfish from dungeness crab to lobsters. 

Go famished, and leave with a full and happy tummy. 

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Along with the “air-conditioning weather” (as termed by many temperatures in the lower 20s), the other signature feature of Autumn is the changing colours of the leaves. 

Bright green leaves turn into red and yellow hues as the forest canopy becomes a large blanket of orange. It’s a sight to behold, and a dream season for travel and photo enthusiasts. 

In case you need more convincing or just want to know the best spots to hit up, here are some of the best places to catch the Autumn foliage in South Korea as you revel in the most beautiful of the seasons. 

1. Jeollabuk-do

Perhaps the best spot in all of South Korea to see the Autumn foliage lies not in major cities like Seoul or Busan, nor even Jeju Island, but in Jeollabuk-do, tucked quietly in the southwestern corner of Korea. 

Naejangsan, or Mt Naejang, is part of the Naejangsan National Park and one of the most popular sites in all of Japan to both locals and tourists wanting to see the Autumn leaves.

Naejang means “many secrets”, which we find rather fitting as the grounds will leave you with much to explore. From 600-year-old nutmeg trees, to spectacular waterfalls, and the famous temple duo of Baekyangsa Temple and Naejangsa Temple, there’s much to see at Naejangsan. The tree-lined path towards Naejangsa Temple, in particular, is stunningly beautiful as you see the Autumn canopy stretch above you. 

2. Seoul

The capital of Korea is known for being a sprawling metropolis, a shopping haven, an Asia technological and engineering giant that has given us Samsung and Hyundai. 

With skyscrapers that dominate the skyline of Seoul, it’s easy to gloss over that the city has numerous mountains and natural scenery that are gorgeous. Lest we forget the various Korean dramas that have been filmed in Seoul, the city provides some of the best spots to see the Autumn foliage. 

Nami Island should be no surprise as the island shot to fame with the production of “Winter Sonata” which has gone on to solidify its place amongst the best in Korean Drama history. 

A visit to Nami Island is differs vastly depending on the season and time of the year, but Autumn is arguably the best season to visit this magical island.  The towering pine trees turn into lovely shades of red and orange as Autumn takes over Nami Island. 

Seoraksan is the third highest mountain in South Korea, an amazing topographical landscape that makes it one of the best places to view the Autumn foliage. 

Whether it’s the highest peaks or the numerous deep valleys, the changing colours of Autumn can be seen all around Seoraksan. You can hike up the mountain through the various trails or take the cable car up to have a bird’s-eye view of everything. 

3. Busan

The phrase “train to Busan” and all its variations is evoked every time anyone talks about travelling to Busan, alluding to the Korean zombie apocalypse movie that was a box office hit

But Busan should be known for being so much more than just a tagline. South Korea’s largest port city, Busan offers a rather distinct feel from Seoul. There are beaches, mountains, and numerous historic temples. The sights and sounds are varied with beautiful natural scenery. It’s not surprising then that Busan has some incredible spots to see the Autumn leaves. 

The romantic scenery of Mount Gayasan has aided greatly in Gayasan National Park being recognised as South Korea’s 9th national park. Just southwest of the mountain and within the grounds of the park is Haeinsa Temple, well known for having the Tripitaka Koreana which are a collection of Buddhist Scriptures carved into 81, 350 wooden printing blocks since 1398. 

The path leading up to Haeinsa Temple is probably one of the most beautiful sections of Gayasan National Park. Whether it’s the bright and beautiful cherry blossoms or the rich and vibrant Autumn leaves, it’s an enchanting walk that will leave you mesmerised. 

Mt Juwangsan is a lot like Mt Seoraksan — deep valleys, waterfalls, and long hiking trails. As you traverse the walkways around the mountain, look below and you’ll be able to see the water drift amongst the rocks, look above and there you’ll find lush vegetation with Autumn leaves. 

One of the highlights in Juwangsan National Park is the Jusanji pond which you should visit in the early morning where slight frost develops on the surface of the water, creating a rather dazzling sight. 

4. Jeju Island

Jeju Island is a popular holiday destination, and with pristine beaches, abundant natural wonders, and beautiful scenery, it is a heaven for outdoor and nature lovers.

Autumn hits Jeju Island slightly later than usual, beginning in mid/late October and peaking in November. 

Mt Hallasan needs little introduction — a dormant volcano that is also the highest mountain in all of South Korea, it is a popular choice amongst travellers all year round. 

The hike during Autumn season, however, can be especially rewarding with the Autumn foliage covering the entire Mt Hallasan. The view from the peak is still as stunning, arguably even more so with various tints of colourful leaves all around you.

While Mt Hallasan is the prominent attraction, Andeok Valley is the hidden oasis that not many know of. The central location of filming for the Korean drama “Chuno”, Andeok Valley is an Autumn paradise. 

The valley got its name from Chianchideok, which means “a view of meandering streams and rocks”. Located in Gansan-ri Village, Andeok Valley lives up to its name, with beautiful gorges and cooling waters cascading down. The valley also has caves from prehistoric times, so when you’re traversing Andeok Valley, keep a lookout for these ancient sanctuaries.

5. Daejeon

It’s a pity not many know the city of Daejeon. Styled as South Korea’s “City of Science and Technology”, it is located in the central region of Korea, connecting the larger cities of Seoul and Busan via rail routes and expressways.

Daejeon is also absolutely spectacular during Autumn, and it would be a pity not to drop by Daejeon to catch the stunning fall foliage. 

The first place you’ll have to visit is Jangtaesan Recreational Forest where you’ll be reminded of Nami Island, only turned up several notches. Come Fall, this lush and thick forest turns into an Autumn wonderland filled with redwood trees for as far as the eye can see.

While everyone heads for the Sky Tower to catch sweeping views of the entire park, the scenic bridge that leads to the tower is stunning as well as you see the trees rise around you. 

Gyeryongsan, or Rooster-Dragon Mountain, was named because the main ridge winds like the body of a dragon while the sharp peaks resemble that of a cockscomb. Gyeryongsan is often considered a sacred mountain in South Korea, holding the honour of being the central holy mountain during various dynasties from the Baekje Kingdom to the Joseon Dynasty.

Today, it is a popular hiking spot and the Gyeryongsan National Park is the region’s most popular. If hiking isn’t in your plans, there’s a recently launched monorail that takes you up along the ridge of Gyeryongsan. Grab a seat comfortably in the monorail as you observe the changing colours of Autumn foliage up this sacred and historic mountain. 

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The bubble tea flame is burning the brightest it has ever been in Singapore. With a new establishment opening per week it almost seems like, one would think that there’s a hidden KPI (Key Performance Indicator) issued down from some large, overlord Taiwanese F&B corporation.

And I get it, sweetened milk tea with chewy pearls make for a great sweet treat, tack on some brown sugar syrup and for some, it’s heaven on earth. If you consider all the XXL Chicken Cutlet and Braised Pork Rice, it’s safe to say that Singaporeans love Taiwanese cuisine. 

But with recent #stayfit campaigns, healthier choices and healthier living appear to be next big thing and that has given renewed attention to alternative drinks that actually have existed for many years now. 

Kombucha drinks may sound trendy, but the beverage has been around for a while now. In fact, kombucha is said to have a history stretching back well into the 18th and 19th Century, with some sources even alluding to its origins in China in 220 B.C. 

Kombucha is essentially a drink consisting of tea and sugar, fermented with a symbiotic culture/colony of bacteria and yeast (SCOPY). What you get is a lightly sweetened fizzy drink falling somewhere between the lines of sparkling apple cider and champagne – with the resultant brew highly dependent on the tea. 

Mainly prized for its detoxifying properties and being packed full of probiotics, Kombucha is said to be very beneficial to maintaining and improving your gut health. 

So, the next time you see that long queue at Liho or Koi, maybe look the other way and get your hands on one of these three Kombucha drinks — before the crowds decide to swing their collective attention this way again. 

1. Bushwick

These drinks comes in what looks like beer bottles and can be dispensed from kegs, but no, beer they are not. What you are looking at is actually Kombucha tea from Bushwick Biotech. 

Relocating from America in 2013, Bushwick brings their organic probiotic beverages to our shores all the way from Brooklyn, New York. When founder Dan Gerick came over, he realised he faced the same problem when he first started in Brooklyn, there was no Kombucha available. 

Thus began the plan to build a craft Kombucha brewery in Singapore. 6 years in and with extensive research, Bushwick Singapore produces their very own organic and completely natural Kombucha, with The Mad Alchemist brand of Kombucha being distributed in cafes islandwide. 

2. Craft & Culture

Craft & Culture, on the other hand, is born and bred locally. The brainchild of co-founders Winnie and Zhi Wei, Craft & Culture was born out of the duo’s love for fermented drinks. 

Since discovering their shared love of Kombucha tea and Kefir milk on a company trip, Winnie and Zhi Wei translated their probiotic brewing experience into an entrepreneur enterprise that delivers on a well-balanced range of Kombucha and Kefir. 

Today, they have partnerships expanding into skincare with the creation of a Kombucha skin balm. The lotion is handmade and apparently free from all the chemical products that are usually present in many commercial brands.

3. Fizzicle Kombucha

Another local product, Melissa Mak is regarded as one of the pioneers in the local Kombucha brewing scene, and her Fizzicle Kombucha consistently tops the list amongst Kombucha breweries in Singapore.

Her specialty resides in refining a sugar-free jun Kombucha with a specific SCOPY culture which ferments honey instead of the type of refined sugar that is commonly found in many other probiotic Kombucha products. This results in a drink that is naturally fizzy that is sweet with a touch of tartness. 

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