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5 Places to Get Your British Fix to Nurse that Post-holiday Craving

5 Places to Get Your British Fix to Nurse that Post-holiday Craving

It’s 1am and you’re wide awake in bed. The jet lag from your trip to London is keeping you tossing and turning, thinking about the shows on West End.

A second later, an audible growling sound echoes throughout the room as you let out a sigh reminiscing about chowing down on Sunday Roast in the heart of London’s bustling Borough Market.

You’d give anything to be back in London, but the logistics of a 14-hour flight seem especially daunting. What’s a lad to do? 

Here, we’ll let you in on our little secret spots that have been keeping our sanity intact. These 5 eateries never fail to transport us back to the culinary epicentre of Britain. 

1. The Queen and Mangosteen

The Queen and Mangosteen may perhaps be the foremost British dining establishment serving up the widest selection of pub grub in Singapore. Styling itself as a “gourmet British pub”, the Queen and Mangosteen has been occupying the VivoCity waterfront for over a decade now.

Although slightly on the pricier side, the pub grub at The Queen and Mangosteen means business. You’ll find all your classics here from Pork Bangers and Mash to Shepherd’s Pie. The Queen and Mangosteen also features the rarely seen Scotch Eggs which are boiled eggs wrapped in minced meat which are then deep-fried to perfection.

The dim lights and dark wooden furniture remind you of a typical pub in the UK but traverse in a little deeper and a bright light greets you at the end. Your view opens up to the Sentosa waterfront where tables will be filled up come sunset.

2. Lad & Dad

Lad & Dad isn’t your typical British restaurant; they aren’t a restaurant per se, or even British for that matter. With Keith being the Lad and his dad being, well, the Dad, this hawker stall whips up authentic British fare at an unmatchable price point.

Toiling away part-time in hotel restaurants whilst pursuing his business degree in London, Keith decided to bring his culinary talents home from his humble dorm room (where his idea for Lad & Dad was birthed) to a small stall in Maxwell Food Centre. For Keith, it was all about making British comfort food affordable and accessible to the masses in Singapore.

The menu isn’t extensive by any stretch but it covers all that you can possibly want for no-frills British nosh. I shall not waste time on anymore words, go straight for the Bacon and Chip Butty (SGD$5) which is an otherworldly adaptation of the English classic — bacon, sunny side-up eggs, and hashbrown all sandwiched between two fluffy toasted buns.

It’s oh so sinful, but oh so good — definitely worth your cheat days.

3. Oxwell & Co.

The people who created Oxwell & Co. are Brits who were longing for that nostalgic pub grub they simply could not get on this side of the Earth. And thank god they did something about it.

Because you can’t get any more British than Fish & Chips, we’re glad to recommend Oxwell & Co.’s iteration. 

At SGD$26, it’s definitely on the higher end of the scale, but you’ll get your money’s worth. The restaurant opts for Sea Bass instead of the typical Dory which means you’ll get a firmer bite but still retain some flakiness that is signature of a Dory fish.

Along with a well-seasoned batter, it’s more than you can ask for in a Brit classic. 

4. The English House, by Marco Pierre White

Helmed by the legendary Chef-restaurateur Marco Pierre White, The English House is the newest British kid on the block. Don’t let it fool you though, when it comes to British nosh and hospitality, it’s no slouch.

Through an extensive restoration process, Marco Pierre White has turned two conservation shophouses along Mohamed Sultan Road into an antiquated space for classical British food and drink. Expect elevated versions of traditional fare like Shepherd’s Pie and Spit-Roast Chicken with Wild Mushrooms. The prices here are, however, exorbitant and that’s putting it lightly. Let’s just say their Fish and Chips go for a mind-numbing SGD$98.

But perhaps that is to be expected — being the youngest chef to be awarded 3 Michelin stars, along with training world-renowned chefs such as Gordon Ramsay and Mario Batali, when Marco Pierre White makes a move, the culinary world shakes.

5. The Penny Black

You can’t talk about British cuisine without including pub grub, and The Penny Black is as close as you can get to the gritty and greasy pubs back in the UK.

A little birdie told me that the entire interior was actually designed and furnished in England, shipped out to Singapore and re-assembled by the same Englishmen who crafted it.

Its Pub Gastronomy menu has brought in more than its fair share of British expats, no doubt helped by the extended happy hours (11.30am – 8pm).

Their Beef and Guinness Pie is nothing short of a crowd-stunner. The puff pastry has a crisp but fluffy texture and breaking it open is like finding a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

The beef stew that is simmering within is robust and infused with the rich and bitter signature Guinness flavour that results in a gravy that is unparalleled.

Coming to The Penny Black is more than just good eating, it’s a full English experience.

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5 Up-and-Coming Attractions to Visit in Beijing

5 Up-and-Coming Attractions to Visit in Beijing

When it comes to Beijing, there is no escaping the big three of the Great Wall of China, the Forbidden City, and Tiananmen Square. And rightfully so, these three sites are so historically significant and tied to the development of China that these sites simply cannot be glossed over.

All that said, China and her history is so expansive and deep that there are many hidden gems to uncover, all of which may even take you a lifetime to explore. Let’s not talk about China, even within the cultural heart that is Beijing, there are many lesser known places tucked away that deserve your attention.

Here are 5 lesser known attractions that you should make time for a visit.

1. 798 Arts District

What was once hipster may perhaps be no more. The 798 Arts District is fast becoming a popular destination for travellers for its burgeoning arts and culinary scene. Back in the 1950s, the East Germans built a Bauhaus-style military complex and one of the unassuming buildings was Factory 798.

Perhaps little did the East Germans or the Chinese foresee the transformation to the foremost arts district in the capital. Today, the 798 Arts District is home to numerous works by leading contemporary Chinese artists revolutionising and pioneering new forms of Chinese art.

There are also restaurants and bars that are bringing their own flair and taste, making the district livelier than it has ever been. With numerous galleries and even more rotational exhibitions, there’s always something new, interesting, and thought-provoking to see at 798, making it a must-go on any travel itinerary.

2. Bai Family Mansion (白家大院)

There’s exposure to culture, and then there’s what we call cultural experience. What’s the difference? It’s like watching the Story of Yanxi Palace 延禧攻略 and getting a glimpse of the Qing dynasty compared to dining on the grounds of an actual prince of the Qing dynasty.

At the Bai Family Mansion, the latter is what you’ll get. The mansion sits on the grounds of what used to be the garden of Prince Li, the first son of the Qing Emperor, rendering a full-flavoured experience straight out of the Qing dynasty.  

The restaurant features food inspired by the imperial cuisine as well as signatures from the Northern province, served by waiters and waitresses donned in traditional Qing clothing from head to toe. Dining at stone tables surrounded by ponds, pavilions, and winding rock paths is as close to a Chinese fairytale as you can get.

3. Dragon Escalator

85 km north of downtown Beijing is a long winding dragon sprawled over the side of a mountain in Longqing gorge. The world’s largest outdoor escalator, the mythical beast is painted with bright yellow and light blue accents, seemingly out of place against the mountain cliff.

Entering the dragon’s mouth will lead you 258 metres up to China’s largest dam. At the top, you can take a cable car or even a boat ride on the artificial lake. For the daredevils out there, a bungee jump down the gorge – and bragging rights – awaits.

4. 1901 Cafe

1901 Cafe reminds us of a time when China had interchanges with the West, something that appears to be all too rare today. A former dormitory for Catholic priests working in the nearby Beitang Cathedral, it has been since converted into a homely three-storey cafe though it has retained its European-style facade.

It’s a perfect way to lounge a day away with their comfortable sofas and comfort food. It certainly helps that they have good coffee as well. Shelves of books and magazines are available for you to read at your leisure. Want a break from all that literature? Head up to the top floor to enjoy a splendid view of old Beijing.

5. Great Wall of China Slide

This feels a little like a cop out because well, it still is the Great Wall of China, but come on, did you know they had a slide? A two-hour drive up north of Beijing, the Mutianyu section of the wall sits in the shadow of its Badaling counterpart. What it lacks in limelight, it makes up for in one of the most imaginative ways to experience the Great Wall.

At Mutianyu, you can ascend the wall via gondola or chairlift (there’s foot too if you’re feeling fit), but it’s the going back down which makes this section special (aside from it being beautifully restored). Once you’re done taking in the sights, a toboggan slide will be waiting for you zoom and zig zag your way down alongside the Great Wall.

The slide takes about an average of 5 minutes and is definitely a must-try if you visit Mutianyu.

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3D2N in Kyoto: Experience Old-World Japan

3D2N in Kyoto: Experience Old-World Japan

Tokyo serves as the modern-day capital of Japan, it is without a doubt the business, economic, and cultural hubbub that is driving the country. What many do not know is that it wasn’t always the capital.

For much of Japan’s history, Kyoto assumed the mantle of being the capital of Japan from 794-1868. You see, traditionally in Japan, wherever the Emperor resides would then assume the title of capital of the country.

Prior to the Meiji Restoration, the Emperor lived in Heian-kyō, which is the modern-day Kyoto, resulting in its status as the capital. This all changed in 1868, when the royal family moved from Kyoto to their new imperial home in Tokyo, where they have remained to present day. Because of its many years as the capital, many in Japan have continued to view Kyoto as the “true” capital. 

Photo by Sorasak on Unsplash

“True” capital or not, Kyoto today is home to countless number of temples, shrines, and historical sites throughout its land. It has one of the world’s largest collections of UNESCO World Heritage sites, totaling some 17 of them.

Join us as we go on a cultural tour of Kyoto, uncovering the historical ins and outs of this heritage-rich city.

How to get there:

If you plan on flying in, take note that Kyoto does not have its own airport so you’re best bet is either Osaka International Airport (ITM) or Kansai International Airport (KIX).

Despite having “International” in its name though, the Osaka airport only serves domestic flights, having stopped its international services some time in the 1990s. So if you plan to fly in, KIX will be your best choice, which will then take about a 75 min train ride aboard Limited Express Haruka to reach Kyoto.

If you’re coming in from Tokyo, it’ll be roughly a 2h 20min train ride from Tokyo Shinagawa Station aboard the Nozomi Shinkansen. You can find the timetable here.

Getting around:

Depending on your length of stay in Kyoto, if it’s for more than 2 days, we’d recommend getting the 3 Day Kansai Thru Pass which will grant you the best access to the extensive bus and non-JR train network in Kyoto.

Unfortunately, there is no single pass that covers both JR and non-JR networks, so it is advisable to also get a rechargeable transport card (ICOCA) that will help you get around on both JR and non-JR train network.

Where to stay:

If you’re deciding on an area to stay, the Geisha neighbourhood of Gion in the heart of Kyoto would be a culturally enriching experience.

It is in this neighbourhood where it’s common to see Geishas sauntering along streets lined with traditional wooden houses. There is a myriad of options for accommodations in Kyoto’s foremost Geisha district, and we’d recommend the Kyoto Granbell Hotel, here is where modern living meets tradition.

Day 1: Ins and Outs of the Higashiyama Area

We start off our cultural foray in the Higashiyama area which is littered with temples and shrines throughout the Northern and Southern parts of Higashiyama.

What may perhaps be one of the top sights in all of Kyoto, the Kiyomizudera Temple (Pure Water Temple) is perched on top of Mount Otowa, giving people a panoramic view of Kyoto. Founded in 780, the temple got its name from the waters of the Otowa Waterfall where it was built.

A UNESCO World Heritage site since 1994, the temple’s viewing gallery just outside the main hall opens up to countless cherry and maple trees, which during the spring and fall seasons, will come alive with myriad of colours that will blow you away.

The Otowa Waterfall is located at the base of the main hall where visitors can drink from three separate streams of water that grants the drinker fortune in terms of longevity, success in school, and in love.

Address

294 Kiyomizu, Higashiyama Ward, Kyoto, 605-0862, Japan

Opening Hours

Daily from 6 AM – 6 PM / 6:30PM (Special opening hours can be viewed here)

After a rejuvenating experience at Kiyomizudera, a great lunch option would be the signature Nishin Soba which was first created in Kyoto. One such joint would be Matsuba Soba, which happens to be one of the oldest Soba establishments operating in Kyoto today.

Nishin Soba is essentially a savoury bowl of buckwheat noodles topped with dried herring fish simmered in a concoction of soy sauce, mirin sweet cooking rice wine, and sugar. A bowl of Nishin Soba can be a comforting pit stop, especially on a cold winter day.

Address

192 Kawabatacho, Higashiyama-ku, Kyoto 605-0076, Kyoto Prefecture

Opening Hours

Daily from 11 AM – 9:30 PM

Now whether Kiyomizudera Temple was your first stop or last, en route to Kiyomizudera you’ll find many religious temples all about and one you should stop by is the Kodai-ji Temple. Built in 1606 by Toyotomi Hideyoshi’s wife in memory of her husband, the Kodai-ji Temple of today is surrounded by beautiful Zen gardens that warrants a short visit,

Address

526 Shimokawaracho, Higashiyama Ward, Kyoto, 605-0825, Japan

Opening Hours

Daily from 9 AM – 5 PM

From Kodai-ji Temple, step back into the bygone era of Samurais and Geishas that is Ishibei-Koji Street. The cobblestoned streets and traditional wooden Japanese houses is a nice juxtaposition to the modern skyscraper world we know today.

Up in Northern Higashiyama, there are numerous temples as well, but we’ll point your way to a lesser known spot called Philosopher’s Path. A 2km stone is enveloped in lush greenery and lined with cherry blossom trees, that as you may have guessed bloom beautifully during hanami season.

If you love cats, keep an eye out because there’s even a spot along the path where these cute felines rest and roll around.

Address

Shishigatani Honenin Nishimachi, Sakyo Ward, Kyoto, 606-8427, Japan

Opening Hours

24 hours

 

Day 2: Journey to the West to Arashiyama

With a good night’s rest, it’s time to travel out a bit to Western Kyoto.

The main attraction is one you’ll recognise all over Instagram— Arashiyama Bamboo Forest.

Indubitably one of the most quiet and serene places in all Japan, the Arashiyama Bamboo Grove is a surreal experience that could prove to be the place that leaves the most indelible impression of the entire trip.

Taking a stroll through the forest is a must, immersing yourself in the peace and tranquility, something that is remarkably far and few between in today’s highly-connected world.

Local tip: Try to get there early in the morning before the sun rises. 

Address

Ukyo Ward, Kyoto, 616-0007, Japan

Opening Hours

24 hours

Near the entrance of Arashiyama Bamboo Forest is the famed Tenryu-ji Temple, which boasts one of the finest gardens in all of Kyoto (and that’s saying something). Ranked at the top as the most important Zen temple in the Arashiyama area, you shouldn’t miss out on this temple when you’re in the area.

Address

68 Sagatenryuji Susukinobabacho, Ukyo Ward, Kyoto, 616-8385, Japan

Opening Hours

Daily from 8:30 AM to 5:30 PM (Until 5:00 PM from late Oct to late Mar)

Before heading back, take a short trip slightly north to Kinkaku-ji Temple, more famously known as the Golden Pavilion. Originally the retirement home of a Shogun, it became a Zen temple with his death in 1408 per the Shogun’s will.

The top two floors of this impressive structure features gold leaf, which is nothing short of majestic as it rests on the riverbank. Now who says temples can’t be luxurious?

Address

1 Kinkakujicho, Kita Ward, Kyoto, 603-8361, Japan

Opening Hours

Daily from 9 AM to 5 PM

Day 3: Explore Downtown Kyoto and Fushimi-Inari

Get an early morning rise and head to the Nishiki Market where you’ll find no shortage of street side food and snacks. Also known as “Kyoto’s Kitchen”, Nishiki Market is a food paradise that buzzes from morning to the evening.

With free samples from practically almost every stall, I can promise you’ll be full from just walking from end to end trying all sorts of delights from Konnamonja Soy Milk Donuts which are crisp on the outside and chewy on the inside to meat skewers and matcha mochi!

Address

609 Nishidaimonjicho Tominokoji Dori Shijoagaru, Nakagyo, Kyoto 604-8054, Kyoto Prefecture

Opening Hours

Daily from 9 AM to 6 PM

With your tummy filled, it’s time to learn about a Japanese cultural phenomenon that has captured the hearts of many Otakus all over the world — yes, the creative world of Manga. The Kyoto International Manga Museum is home to over 50,000 publications and three floors of Manga.

 

The main draw is of course the large collection of Manga available for reading and most of these are in Japanese, of course there are some translated ones as well. You’ll also find some temporary exhibitions that celebrate both local and international manga artists and their works.

It’s a place for Otakus to unite!

Address

Karasuma-dori Oike-agaruKyoto 604-0846, Kyoto Prefecture

Opening Hours

Daily from 10 AM to 6 PM

The trip culminates in what may be the number one attraction in all of Kyoto, a site that is photographed and instagrammed all over the world — the Fushimi-Inari Shrine. Easily recognised with its iconic vermilion torii gates, Fushimi-Inari is almost synonymous with Kyoto today.

Many know the beautiful orange gates, but not what it enshrines. Fushimi-Inari celebrates the god Inari, which is the god of rice, harvest, commerce, and business. The messenger of Inari is a fox, which explains the numerous fox statues and images around the grounds.

Photo by Nicole Y-C on Unsplash

Don’t miss out on the short hike up Mount Inari-san and the pilgrimage walk around the shrines near the top during your visit to Fushimi-Inari to have the most enriching experience.

Address

68 Fukakusa Yabunouchicho, Fushimi Ward, Kyoto, 612-0882, Japan

Opening Hours

24 hours

Photo by Jan Gottweiss on Unsplash

Saskatchewan, the Unpronounceable State of Canada

Saskatchewan, the Unpronounceable State of Canada

Let alone being able to pronounce, hardly anyone knows the existence of small city Saskatoon (Sas-kuh-toon) in the Canadian province of Saskatchewan (Suhs-kat-che-wan) this side of the world.

Known for being cold and remote, it’s hardly (or rather never) associated with when travelling to Canada. The big names are Toronto and Vancouver with Montreal and Quebec City being sprinkled in conversations every now and then.

It’s not hard to see why: firstly, there are no direct international flights to Saskatoon, one has to transit from Vancouver. Second, the winters can be a rough time and those in hotter climate pine for a nice cold winter holiday but not this kind of winter.

There’s also a running joke in Canadian circles that if your dog runs away in Saskatchewan, you don’t have to worry too much because can still see it after a few days as the lands are completely flat.

Paris of the Prairies

And I guess they aren’t wrong, the Paris of the Prairies as Saskatoon has often been called, have lands that are flat as far as the eye can see. Tack on the harsh winter that sweeps across Saskatoon, and not many are flocking there for their once in a year vacation.

But despite the -30℃, Saskatoon has a deep and inner warmth that not many around the world are privy to.

I remember trekking along the side of the road, trying to navigate to Wanuskewin Heritage Park, just slightly north of town. My boot was sinking deeper and deeper into the snow as cars whizzed past me on the highway. It must have been some 20 below 0 as I huddled and stared at a screenshot of the Google Maps I saved.

“Really wished I had WiFi right about now,” I muttered under my breath.

It looked like a short walk from the bus stop but I grossly underestimated the distance. There was no public transport and cabs were simply way too expensive. There was no building in sight, not even a highway petrol station.

Putting my head down and coat up, I trudged onwards, hoping to reach Wanuskewin Heritage Park before it closes.

15 minutes later and it didn’t seem like I was making much or any headway. Up ahead was a car parked on the shoulder of the road forcing me to wrap around it as snow continuously pelted my face. I had half a mind to turn tail and just head back to my dorm.

As I walked by the side of the car, a voice sounded out of the car, “Do you need help? Are you lost?” I turned to see a woman roughly in her late 20s with a cigarette in a her hand looking at me like I’m a lost puppy.

What followed was me hitching a ride in a totally random stranger’s car which was probably the most #YOLO thing I’d ever done.

It was a signature moment of what exemplifies the Saskatoonian spirit and the truth is, this spirit permeates throughout society, seen in the little things that everyone I had the pleasure to meet had graced me with.

From flashing the most heart-warming smiles to a simple “hello” and “good morning” as you walk by each other, it seemed the people of Saskatoon have rallied behind their kind loving nature that not even the freezing winter can shake.

Dynamic Culinary Scene

And for a place that is often categorised as remote and uninteresting, it is a happening city. The culinary scene is vibrant and buzzing, spearheaded by Top Chef Canada 2011 winner Dale Mackay who chose to open his flagship Ayden Kitchen and Bar in Saskatoon. Hipster cafes are sprouting up by the dozens, filling the cold air with warm smells of baguettes and croissants.

Chef Dale Mackay

Photo by aydenkitchenbar via Instagram

Museum with Avant-garde Architecture

The Arts got a serious boost with the construction of the new Remai Modern Museum overlooking the iconic Saskatchewan River.

Come Summer, the Farmer’s Market in the heart of town comes alive where you’ll find the freshest baked goods to the iconic Saskatoon berries.

The niceties that seem exceptional and out of the way are common and second-nature to the people of Saskatoon. Many proclaim Canadians to be one of the nicest people in the world, sometimes to a fault. Well, in places like Vancouver and Toronto, you can still see the influence of a huge cosmopolitan city and its effect on people.

But this is the cold and remote Saskatoon in the state of Saskatchewan, where warm hearts battle the frigid winter.

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5 Family-friendly Accommodations in Seoul

5 Family-friendly Accommodations in Seoul

So you’ve made the decision to bring the whole family to experience Seoul for a much-needed vacation at the end of the year, hoping for a nice cooling winter getaway. The flight has been booked and you know the hot spots you want to check off on your list. And now, the conundrum — where to stay?

Seoul is as developed a cosmopolitan city as they come, so you’ll be sure to find a host of accommodations to stay at. Ranging from exquisite hotels to quality Airbnbs, and even a luxurious traditional Hanok (traditional Korean house), here’s our picks of some of the top accommodations for the entire family.

HOTELS

Hotels have been on the back end of some decline with the rise of Airbnbs over the past couple years but when it comes to good quality accommodations for families, hotels still reign supreme for many.

Lotte Hotel World

Ranking high on most lists out there, if you want a hotel that caters for the family, there’s perhaps no better option than Lotte Hotel World. It’s not anywhere near the central tourist-y hub of Seoul, but trust us when we say you’re kids will love it.

Image of Lotty Lorry Room with image courtesy from LOTTE HOTEL

Their signature character Lotty Lorry rooms are a hit among the kids. Lotty and Lorry are of course the mascots of Lotte World Adventure, the famed theme park in Seoul. Designed in bright colours with soft toys of the mascots and a cute cartoon-y decor, it’s certainly a room that will be nothing short of memorable for your kids.

With the stamping grounds of Lotte World Adventure theme park just outside the hotel’s doorstep, it’s a dream vacation for a family with small kids.

Book now

Grand Hyatt Seoul

Moving closer to the city centre, we have the Grand Hyatt Seoul.

Grand Hyatt’s proximity to Myeongdong and cultural spots is what sells it, aside from the myriad of high class amenities and facilities. The panoramic stunning views of the city that the 601 rooms offer are simply a bonus.

Most importantly for the kids, the hotel has a fully utilised outdoor space which is a swimming pool in the Summer and wait for it, an ice skating rink in the Winter. If you’re heading to Seoul during Winter, it’s time to lace up those skates at Grand Hyatt Seoul.

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Airbnbs

Airbnbs have revolutionised the accommodation game for years now and it’s not difficult to see why with prices that are nearly unmatchable by hotels. For families that want the “home away from home” feel, these Airbnbs will do the trick.

Image via Airbnb

JJ’s Luxurious Suite

This Airbnb is an apartment suite that is big enough for the whole family and then some. Able to accommodate up to 5 guests, this apartment suite has the look, feel, and even some of the amenities of a hotel.

Add on a stove, microwave, dining utensils, and a washing machine, there’s everything you can find for perhaps an extended stay in Korea. It’s an apartment suite for the family, and its location near Gyeongbukgung Palace would mean it’s relatively near the central hubbub of Seoul but not too crowded at night to disturb for a family’s night rest.

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Henry & Bonnie’s Apartment

Image via Airbnb

Location, location, location.

It’s all about location and convenience with this Airbnb apartment. Tucked in the busy streets of Myeongdong, everything in the shopping enclave are minutes away from the apartment. Oh, you won’t have to worry about having a big family because the listing can host up to 7 people.

There are also plushies of the iconic Line mascots, Brown and Cony, injecting some youthfulness into the apartment, something that kids will appreciate I’m sure.

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TRADITIONAL HANOKS

If you want to have a fresh accommodation experience for your family, then a stay traditional Hanok would be due. The dense city of Seoul is inundated with towering skyscrapers and where hotels are a dime a dozen, it’s safe to say Seoul is as modern as they come.

Hanoks, however, are traditional Korean houses which bring you back to a long bygone era of Korean history. Staying in a Hanok is an experience that is off the beaten track as many say, something that would be memorable for the whole family.

Rakkojae is one luxury Hanok reminiscent of an aristocratic Chosun Dynasty home. The place in Seoul has a history of about 130 years, and stepping through the front gates of Rakkojae makes it feel you’ve stepped into your very own historical Kdrama.

If you’re worried about how Rakkojae compares to hotels and Airbnbs, have no worries because all the basic amenities are available here including WiFi! Each room features a jade stone ondol floor, and onsite is a yellow mud sauna facility along with a wide range of cultural immersion programs from kimchi making to a traditional tea ceremony.

So, if you truly want something out of the ordinary, away from the typical hotels and Airbnbs, staying in Rakkojae is the way to go.

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